Curriculum: Associate of Applied Business in Financial Management Technology

August 04, 2021
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curriculum icon Curriculum at a Glance

With UC Online’s Associate of Applied Business in Financial Management Technology, all of your coursework is completed online. Upon successful completion of this program, you will be able to:

  • Effectively communicate in a business setting
  • Use critical thinking skills to solve problems
  • Understand and be prepared to utilize basic financial principals and concepts

Sample Curriculum

A customized curriculum map for the Financial Management Technology program is available to fit your schedule and pace. Part-time and full-time options are available to all students. For the convenience of our online students, we offer multiple (6) start dates per year – twice in the spring, summer and fall.

Students are required to complete a minimum of 60 credit hours for the associate degree Financial Management Technology program.

Accreditation: The University of Cincinnati and all of its regional campuses are accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

First Year Experience Course

Student will select one First Year Experience course:

MGMT 1085 Decision Making Tools: FYE course that provides an introduction to the university, exploration of business programs and career opportunities, and tools that promote making decisions.

MGMT 1080 Problem Solving Tools: FYE course that provides an introduction to the university, exploration of business programs and career opportunities, and tools that promote solving problems.

MGMT 1050 Introduction to Business: FYE course that provides and introduction to the university, opportunity to explore business programs and career opportunities, and overview of business structure and issues.

Introduction to Microeconomics

The course assists students to learn and comprehend (1) economics as a social science that draws conclusions based on hypotheses, theories, and data in order to understand human behavior, (2) basic microeconomics terms and concepts, including scarcity and choice, equilibrium, efficiency and equity, positive and normative economics, comparative advantage, and specialization, (3) the fundamental economic question of allocating scarce resources, (4) opportunity cost and the production possibility frontier, (5) supply and demand, the function of prices in markets, how markets work and sometimes don't work, including market failure and externalities, (6) the effects of government intervention in markets, (7) how consumers make choices, (8) production theory, (9) the costs of production, (10) firm behavior in competitive markets, (11) firm behavior in imperfect markets, (12) elasticity and its application, (13) markets for resources, the determination of wage rates, interest, and rent, (14) the determination of income distribution, including poverty and discrimination, (15) the determinants of international trade flows, (16) to apply economic

Financial Accounting

This course develops foundational knowledge and skills needed to prepare and analyze basic financial statements. Topics include cash, inventory, fixed assets, current and long-term liabilities and equity. Students will prepare multi-step income statements, classified balance sheets and statements of cash flows. Students will utilize efficiency and effectiveness ratios, as well as vertical and horizontal analysis, to evaluate financial performance.

Computer Applications

In this course, students perform basic business and academic tasks on a PC running the Windows operating system. Students are provided instruction in the Microsoft Office suite that covers Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. Students learn how to work with a word processor, spreadsheet, data tables, and presentation software.

English Composition

English Composition 1001 is a writing-centered course that emphasizes the careful reading, analytical thinking, and persuasive strategies inherent in researching and writing within an academic community. Students learn that rhetorical knowledge is the basis of composing while learning to write with purpose, audience, context, and conventions in mind. Students develop rigorous academic research practices: how to locate and evaluate primary and secondary sources relevant to their line of inquiry and position their own ideas in conversation with public writing. Students also engage in regular self-reflection: articulating what they know, what they can do, and how to apply their knowledge and skills in various contexts.

Fundamentals of Management

This course is an introduction to theories and techniques of management. Course topics include an overview of managerial functions, organizational communication and group theories. The course emphasizes on the application of management skills by responding to a variety of case scenarios that require identifying the case problem and deciding on an appropriate remedy. This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, and does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Managerial Accounting

This course develops foundational knowledge and skills needed to apply accounting data in planning and controlling business operations. Topics include costs, cost drivers and allocation, contribution margin and managerial budgeting.

Introduction to Marketing

Marketing activities, analysis, strategies, and decision making in the context of other business functions. Topics include: integration of product, price, promotion, and distribution activities; research and analysis of markets, environments, competition, and customers; market segmentation and selection of target markets; and emphasis on behavior and perspectives of consumers and organizational customers. Planning and decision making for products and services in profit and nonprofit, domestic and global settings.

Introduction to Macroeconomics

The course assists students to learn and comprehend (1) economics as a social science that draws conclusions based on hypotheses, theories, and data in order to understand human behavior, (2) basic macroeconomic terminology and concepts, including the distinction between real and nominal magnitudes, (3) the national income accounts, (4) the nature of the business cycle, (5) the determinates of important macroeconomic variables,including the level of income, the level of employment, the unemployment rate, the natural rate of unemployment, the price level, the inflation rate, productivity and the rate of interest, (6) the supply and demand for money, (7)the Federal Reserve System, (8) aggregate demand and aggregate supply, (9) the effects of fiscal and monetary policies, (10) the basics of theories of macroeconomic instability, (11) unemployment and inflation tradeoffs, (12) the effects of the federal government's budget deficit, (13) long run growth and policies to affect growth, (14) comparative advantage, (15) the determinants of foreign trade flows and exchange rates, and their effects on the domestic economy, (16) to apply economic reasoning to better understand and critically evaluate real world circumstances and events.

Introduction to Statistics

A one-semester comprehensive introduction to statistics suitable for students in biology, nursing, allied health, and applied science. Discussion of data, frequency distributions, graphical and numerical summaries, design of statistical studies, and probability as a basis for statistical inference and prediction. The concepts and practice of statistical inference including confidence intervals, one and two sample t-tests, chi-square tests, regression and analysis of variance, with attention to selecting the procedure(s) appropriate for the question and data structure, and interpreting and using the result. Pre-requisite: At least 420 on the MPT strongly recommended.

Fundamentals of Business Finance

This introductory course covers the fundamental elements of finance, including how to read and to use financial statements, and how to employ ratios and performance measures. The course will deal with working capital management, capital budgeting, financial leverage, capital structure, and cost of capital. This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, it does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Personal Finance

Planning and management of personal financial problems, personal finance plans, budgets, credit and savings institutions in family financing, insurance, real estate, health insurance, and other financial issues.

Fundamentals of Financial Planning

An introduction to the financial planning process,portfolio management, retirement planning, and estate planning. This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, it does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Humanities Elective

Student will select a Humanities Elective.

Intermediate Composition

Intermediate Composition is a writing-centered course that builds on what students learn in first-year composition and focuses students’ attention on theoretical underpinning of how meaning is made, understood, and communicated within and across various discourse communities and genres. The course emphasizes critical reading and writing, advanced research and analysis skills, and rhetorical sensitivity to differences in academic, professional, and public composing. This course challenges students to engage in substantive projects drawing on primary research and source analysis methods and asks students to document, communicate, and reflect on their research.

Fundamentals of Risk Management

Introduction to the insurance industry; identifying and planning for business and personalrisk exposures; using insurance for personal auto/home and commercial property/liability needs.This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, it does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Stock Markets and Investments

Investment vehicles, market characteristics, investment philosophies,investing for capital appreciation,setting and achieving personal investment objectives.

Natural Sciences Elective

Student will select a Natural Sciences Elective.

Business Elective

Student may choose one course elective: Fundamentals of Computerized Accounting, Fundamentals of Tax Preparation Service Learning, Fundamentals of Topics in Accounting, Fundamentals of Human Relations, Fundamentals of Human Resources, Fundamentals of Advertising & Promotion, Fundamentals of Digital Marketing, Fundamentals of Personal Selling & Sales Management or Fundamentals of Consumer Behavior.

For more information, speak to your Academic Advisor.

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