Curriculum: Associate of Applied Business in Accounting

November 15, 2021
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January 10, 2022
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curriculum icon Curriculum at a Glance

With UC Online’s Associate of Applied Business in Accounting, all of your coursework is completed online.

Sample Curriculum
Customized curriculum map for the AAB Accounting program is available to fit your schedule and pace. Part-time and Full-time options are available to all students. Summer term courses are also offered. Program accepts students 3 time a year, Spring, Summer or Fall. Self paced online orientation is required after you are accepted to the program.

English Composition

English Composition 1001 is a writing-centered course that emphasizes the careful reading, analytical thinking, and persuasive strategies inherent in researching and writing within an academic community. Students learn that rhetorical knowledge is the basis of composing while learning to write with purpose, audience, context, and conventions in mind. Students develop rigorous academic research practices: how to locate and evaluate primary and secondary sources relevant to their line of inquiry and position their own ideas in conversation with public writing. Students also engage in regular self-reflection: articulating what they know, what they can do, and how to apply their knowledge and skills in various contexts.

Financial Accounting

This course develops foundational knowledge and skills needed to prepare and analyze basic financial statements. Topics include cash, inventory, fixed assets, current and long-term liabilities and equity. Students will prepare multi-step income statements, classified balance sheets and statements of cash flows. Students will utilize efficiency and effectiveness ratios, as well as vertical and horizontal analysis, to evaluate financial performance.

Introduction to Microeconomics

The course assists students to learn and comprehend (1) economics as a social science that draws conclusions based on hypotheses, theories, and data in order to understand human behavior, (2) basic microeconomics terms and concepts, including scarcity and choice, equilibrium, efficiency and equity, positive and normative economics, comparative advantage, and specialization, (3) the fundamental economic question of allocating scarce resources, (4) opportunity cost and the production possibility frontier, (5) supply and demand, the function of prices in markets, how markets work and sometimes don't work, including market failure and externalities, (6) the effects of government intervention in markets, (7) how consumers make choices, (8) production theory, (9) the costs of production, (10) firm behavior in competitive markets, (11) firm behavior in imperfect markets, (12) elasticity and its application, (13) markets for resources, the determination of wage rates, interest, and rent, (14) the determination of income distribution, including poverty and discrimination, (15) the determinants of international trade flows, (16) to apply economic

IT/IS

IT/IS Requirement Choose one:  IT1001C Computer Applications  or IS2080C Digital Technologies for Business

Introduction to Business

FYE course that provides an introduction to the university, opportunity to explore business programs and career opportunities, and overview of business structure and issues.

Managerial Accounting

This course develops foundational knowledge and skills needed to apply accounting data in planning and controlling business operations. Topics include costs, cost drivers and allocation, contribution margin and managerial budgeting.

Fundamentals of Management

This course is an introduction to theories and techniques of management. Course topics include an overview of managerial functions, organizational communication and group theories. The course emphasizes on the application of management skills by responding to a variety of case scenarios that require identifying the case problem and deciding on an appropriate remedy. This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, and does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Introduction to Marketing

Marketing activities, analysis, strategies, and decision making in the context of other business functions. Topics include: integration of product, price, promotion, and distribution activities; research and analysis of markets, environments, competition, and customers; market segmentation and selection of target markets; and emphasis on behavior and perspectives of consumers and organizational customers. Planning and decision making for products and services in profit and nonprofit, domestic and global settings.

Introduction to Macroeconomics

The course assists students to learn and comprehend (1) economics as a social science that draws conclusions based on hypotheses, theories, and data in order to understand human behavior, (2) basic macroeconomic terminology and concepts, including the distinction between real and nominal magnitudes, (3) the national income accounts, (4) the nature of the business cycle, (5) the determinates of important macroeconomic variables,including the level of income, the level of employment, the unemployment rate, the natural rate of unemployment, the price level, the inflation rate, productivity and the rate of interest, (6) the supply and demand for money, (7)the Federal Reserve System, (8) aggregate demand and aggregate supply, (9) the effects of fiscal and monetary policies, (10) the basics of theories of macroeconomic instability, (11) unemployment and inflation tradeoffs, (12) the effects of the federal government's budget deficit, (13) long run growth and policies to affect growth, (14) comparative advantage, (15) the determinants of foreign trade flows and exchange rates, and their effects on the domestic economy, (16) to apply economic reasoning to better understand and critically evaluate real world circumstances and events.

MATH/STAT

MATH/STAT Requirement Choose one MATH1008 Foundations of Quantitative Reasoning, STAT1031 Introduction to Statistics or STAT1034 Elementary Statistics

Fundamentals of Computerized Accounting

This course will introduce students to the basics of accounting through the use of a computerized accounting program. This includes analysis of transactions, data entry, and preparation and analysis of computer generated financial statements and reports. This is a hands-on course with the accounting software provided with the textbook. This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, and does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Fundamentals of Business Finance

This introductory course covers the fundamental elements of finance, including how to read and to use financial statements, and how to employ ratios and performance measures. The course will deal with working capital management, capital budgeting, financial leverage, capital structure, and cost of capital. This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, it does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Fundamentals of Tax Preparation

This course provides students the opportunity to understand the principles behind tax law while they learn how to work with clients to obtain the information they will need to complete tax forms. The focus of the course is tax return preparation for individuals and small businesses. This course is intended for the Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, and does not apply toward the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree.

Natural Science Elective

Student will select a Natural Science Elective.

General Education Elective

Student may select one course from Humanities & Literature, Historical Perspectives, or Fine Arts Breath of Knowledge (BOK) area

Fundamentals of Topics in Accounting

This course will introduce students to advanced topics in accounting such as payroll, auditing, and not-for-profit accounting. Current topics in accounting will be discussed. In addition, students will complete a comprehensive manual accounting practice set in order to understand therole and importance of basic business documents, records, information flows, and internal controls in the accounting process. Prerequisite: FinancialAccounting, ACCT 2081. This course is intended forthe Associate of Applied Business (AAB) program, and does not apply toward a Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA).

Intermediate Composition

Intermediate Composition is a writing-centered course that builds on what students learn in first-year composition and focuses students’ attention on theoretical underpinning of how meaning is made, understood, and communicated within and across various discourse communities and genres. The course emphasizes critical reading and writing, advanced research and analysis skills, and rhetorical sensitivity to differences in academic, professional, and public composing. This course challenges students to engage in substantive projects drawing on primary research and source analysis methods and asks students to document, communicate, and reflect on their research.

Advanced Bookkeeping

Advanced Bookkeeping is a comprehensive, higher-order analysis of the financial accounting topics presented in Financial Accounting I and II.Additionally, this course emphasizes mastery of the skills and knowledge required to obtain a bookkeeping certification in the state of Ohio. Such certification signifies that an individual has obtained the skills necessary to carry out full-charge accounting functions in a small business (firms up to 100 employees). These functions incorporate a mastery of the accounting cycle which includes processing daily transactions, making adjusting entries, preparing financial statements, and closing the accounting records. Particular emphasis is placed on bank reconciliations, adjusting entries, payroll, depreciation methodology, inventory accounting, internal controls, fraud prevention, and error correction. This is a professional course requiring intensive study and analysis. Students who have not taken Financial Accounting I and II within the last two years may have difficulty. Theprerequisite for this course is ACTN 242.

Fundamentals of Fraud Examination

This course provides a broad understanding of financial fraud including what it is and how it iscommitted, prevented, and resolved. The behavior and social factors that motivate occupational offenders are explored. A fraud examination methodology is presented and major types of fraud are discussed in detail. Fraud topics covered include skimming, cash larceny, billing schemes, check tampering, employee payroll and reimbursement schemes, asset misappropriation, corruption, and fraudulent financial reporting schemes. Additionally, fraud detection techniques are discussed including interviewing witnesses, conducting investigations, and writing reports.

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